In a photo from Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, in Detroit, an exhibit at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History features a "tribute to the Queen of Soul." "THINK" opens to the public Tuesday at the museum that hosted Aretha Franklin's public visitations after her death last month. It features archival photographs, videos and the red shoes she wore at her first visitation that drew global attention. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Image Credit: AP

The Detroit museum that hosted Aretha Franklin’s public visitations after her death isn’t finished honouring the singular singer.

Billed as a “tribute to the Queen of Soul,” ‘Think’ opens to the public on Tuesday at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. It features photographs, videos and the red shoes she wore at her first funeral viewing that drew global attention.

The intimate exhibit is expected to change and offer surprises over its four-month run — much as its subject did. Officials say it aims to connect with her fans, roughly 31,000 of whom attended the visitations.

The exhibit is a prelude to what the museum envisions as a larger, long-term exhibit late next year or in early 2020. And Franklin’s relatives say both could be a proving ground for a permanent museum honouring her and the family.

Franklin died on August 16 at 76.