Muslim Congresswoman Ilhan Omar made history by wearing hijab on the floor of the House of Representatives as rules are changed to allow religious head coverings — then sworn in on the Quran. Image Credit: Twitter

Muslim Congresswoman Ilhan Omar made history by wearing hijab on the floor of the House of Representatives as rules were changed to allow religious head coverings. Then she was sworn in on the Quran.

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Ilhan Omar, one of the first female Muslim members of Congress, was allowed to wear her hijab on the House floor.

The Democratic representative from Minnesota made history as rules were changed to allow her to cover her head.

Under new their House rules, regular hats — such as baseball caps and cowboy hats — will continue to be banned, while religious gear will be permitted.

'No one puts a scarf on my head but me. It's my choice—one protected by the first amendment,' she tweeted

Omar, 37, posed on the floor with California Democrat Eric Swalwell's young baby

Somali-born Omar came to the US as a child refugee after living in a camp for displaced people in Kenya.

Historic

  • The Congresswoman overcomes 181-year headwear ban while Rashida Tlaib takes oath on Qur’an that belonged to Thomas Jefferson
  • Twenty-three years after leaving a refugee camp in Kenya, Ilhan Omar on Thursday became the first member of the US Congress to wear a hijab.
  • Rules were changed to allow Omar, a Muslim sworn in on the Qur’an, to wear a religious head covering on the floor of the House. There had been a 181-year ban on headwear of any type in the chamber.

Omar, a Democrat, was part of a historically diverse freshman class in the 116th Congress sworn in amid cheers and jubilation.

The House now has a record 102 women and a new generation of Muslims, Latinos, Native Americans and African Americans, more closely resembling the US population and set to take on Donald Trump in a new era of divided government.

But on the Republican side, the House still consists mostly of white men.

Omar, 36, from Minnesota, tweeted: “As a kid, I acted as my grandfather’s translator at our caucuses and he was the one who first sparked my interest in politics. I wish he could be here to witness this historic moment, but he was here in spirit as I placed my hand on his Quran for the ceremonial swearing in.”