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Yemen’s man-made cholera outbreak is about to break record

Yemen could have a million cholera cases by the end of the year if current trends persist

Image Credit: REUTERS
Cholera victim Seddiqi Noor Al Deen Ali, 7, lies in a cholera treatment centre in the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah on Sunday. Yemen will soon surpass Haiti, which has documented about 815,000 cholera cases.
Gulf News

Washington: In a matter of days, the deadly cholera epidemic in Yemen will set a world record.

The outbreak is entirely man-made.

Two-and-a-half years of civil war have decimated Yemen’s water sanitation system and its hospitals. Without access to clean water, doctors or medical supplies, hundreds of thousands of Yemenis have contracted cholera, which spreads through fecal bacteria in water.

At last count on October 2, Yemen had 777,229 suspected cases of cholera, with the death toll at 2,134 people, according to the World Health Organisation.

Soon, Yemen will surpass Haiti, which has documented about 815,000 cholera cases. In Haiti, however, the outbreak began in 2010, and has taken seven years to reach that figure. In Yemen, it has taken only about six months to reach those alarmingly high numbers.

“Since WHO records began in 1949, there hasn’t been a faster outbreak on record than we’ve seen in Yemen,” Ruairidh Villar of Save the Children said.

“And in the next few days, Yemen will also become the largest since records began.”

The International Committee of the Red Cross has warned that if current trends persist, Yemen could have a million cholera cases by the end of the year.

More than half the cholera patients are under the age of 18, and 26 per cent are under the age of five, according to WHO statistics.

“It is completely shocking. The existence of a cholera outbreak in general is unforgivable in the 21st century because it means there’s no access to clean water or sanitation,” Villar said. “This shouldn’t happen.”

Health experts say the precise reason why cholera has spread so quickly in Yemen remains unclear. But with health workers no longer getting paid or no longer able to visit some communities, and much of the population lacking access to clean water, the war has created the conditions for the unprecedented outbreak.

“While it’s difficult to get information about what exactly has led to the outbreak, it’s clear that Yemen’s health infrastructure and sanitation services have come under sustained attack throughout the course of the conflict, allowing bacteria like cholera to easily spread,” said Homer Venters, director of programs at New York-based Physicians for Human Rights.

“What’s more, while cholera is treatable, life-saving medical supplies aren’t reaching communities in need,” he said.

“If you can give somebody clean water, a drip for the severest cases, you can transform somebody from essentially the brink of death to sitting up and well again in hours,” Villar said.

A safe oral vaccine has also been developed that can help contain a cholera outbreak. International health organisations had plans to distribute the vaccine, but cancelled the campaign in July, citing dangerous conditions on the ground.

Origins of cholera

Cholera is endemic in many countries in Asia and Africa and its origin has been traced back to the Ganges Delta in Bangladesh.

It’s a disease that afflicts poorer countries with flawed sanitation and unsafe drinking water. If left untreated, a patient can die of dehydration. But cholera can be treated relatively easily and inexpensively with clean water and intravenous fluids.

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