Are men's issues ignored? Gulf News readers debate. Image Credit: Supplied

The debate

On International Men’s Day earlier this month, many asked: “Isn’t every day Men’s Day?” But there are issues that disproportionately affect men — suicides, work place deaths and homelessness. Is that attitude taking away from issues that need to be addressed? Gulf News readers debate.

Resilience

No Men’s Day, but address the issues

Yes, I would say so. Men, who was traditionally the breadwinner of the family, has his own internal battles. Even though they are the patriarchal figure, they are also emotional. If things go against plan or something catastrophinc happens, they are much more prone to break down because they are often not as resilient as women. Having said that, I don’t think International Men’s Day should be celebrated because nowasdays such days have just become a fad. There’s a Milk Day as well and it is just a figment of someone’s imagination.

Even though they are the patriarchal figure, they are also emotional

- Fayaz Khan Farooqui

However, men’s issues need to be addressed. Because, yes, cases of suicide are higher among men. I would not generalise, because some men have high resilience, but proper education, guidleines, support groups and an exposure to certain challenging environments will help them address any problems they might be facing. Also, nothing having a supportive partner goes a long way in maintaining mental stability.

From Mr Fayaz Khan Farooqui

Cricket commentator living in Sharjah

Gender Wars

Women’s issues need more attention

I would disagree that men’s issues get ignored. I do believe issues like suicides and depression affect men, but many women’s issues like Female Genital Mutilation or female foeticide aren’t covered enough. Just the fact the society is still called a patriarchal society is enough to understand the topic being debated. Perhaps I feel that way because I am from an Asian culture, where even today women’s issues are not covered as much as they need to be.

Many women’s issues like Female Genital Mutilation or female foeticide aren’t covered enough.

- Annette Davison

At this point in time I feel like women’s issues need to get addressed more. Even if you look at the issue of toxic masculinity, it was raised and is discussed. People are talking a lot more about how men don’t necessarily need to be the leader of their family and that they can be soft and sensitive. Just because of this, a huge change in mindset has occurred where people are becoming more aware of mental health issues and realise that men don’t have to be ‘macho’, and that being friendly does not make you feminine and you don’t have to stick to a mould.

From Ms Annette Davison

Commerce student living in Dubai

Mutual appreciation

Both the genders are working equally

Today, men and women are hand in hand in every corner of the world and in every business. Both the genders are working equally. So, I do not think arguments like, “Why do we need a Men’s Day? Isn’t every day Men’s Day?” should be made. As a human being, be it man or woman, everyone goes through a bad day and faces issues that could lead to stress or suicide.

Society creates a block where it expects men to not cry or express feelings ... We also sacrifice a lot to reach a comfortable position for ourselves and our family.

- Prashant Bhatia

When it comes to men, society creates a block where it expects men to not cry or express feelings. People cannot digest the fact that as a human being a male also goes through the trauma and has feelings just like a woman. This plays a role in the mental health issues, for sure.

When we celebrate Father’s Day or Mother’s Day, we take the time out to apprecaite their role in our lives. Why not a Men’s Day to appreciate them and create awareness about what men are doing around the world. We also sacrifice a lot to reach a comfortable position for ourselves and our family.

From Mr Prashant Bhatia

Business Development Manager living in Dubai

Gulf News asked: Do you think men’s issues get ignored because they have been in positions of power in society?

  • Yes 77%
  • No 33%