Opinion | Columnists

'Talk to children about rape’s root causes'

Next generation must be encouraged to challenge the sexism and inequality that make violence against women possible

  • By Desmond Tutu, Jacob Lief and Sohaila Abdulali
  • Published: 16:24 April 28, 2013
  • Gulf News

  • Image Credit: EPA
  • College girls shout slogans in a rally to protest against a New Delhi gang-rape incident, demanding justice in Bhopal.

What will you discuss with your children this evening? Sports, the weather, celebrity gossip, rape? We are from three generations (aged 81, 50 and 36), three faiths (Christian, Muslim, Jewish) and three continents (Africa, Asia, North America). One of us is a religious leader, one a writer and rape survivor and one the CEO of a non-profit organisation. We come together in the wake of the recent upheaval around rape in India, South Africa, the US and the UK, because we share a passionate conviction: We must bring the discourse home to the next generation on every continent.

Why did the men in the recent India and South Africa crimes rape, torture, and murder their victims? How could Jimmy Savile of the BBC molest hundreds of people and still die a hero? Why did the gang-rapists in Ohio feel safe boasting on camera about what they had done? Why do too many Indians dehumanise women, and too many South Africans believe that men are just intrinsically badly behaved and programmed to rape? Who do we think these sub-human women and out-of-control men are?

They are us and, if we are not careful, they will be our children. We do not have the answers, but we should all be asking the questions, and we should include our sons, daughters and all the young people in our lives in our discussions. We need to stop behaving as if it’s all a terrible problem out there, and start talking about it with each other and with our children.

So much ink has been spilt in the media over the past few weeks. Rape has become a ubiquitous global topic, and that is encouraging since it is a global blot on our collective humanity. But hardly anyone has paid attention to how this affects the most important group of all: The next generation, which is poised to inherit our poisonous baggage.

The fact is, rape is utterly commonplace in all our cultures. It is part of the fabric of everyday life, yet we all act as if it’s something shocking and extraordinary whenever it hits the headlines. We remain silent, and so we condone it. The three of us deal with this issue in different ways every day of our lives, yet we too are guilty of protesting articulately outside but leaving it on the other side of the door when we sit down to dinner with our families. Until rape, and the structures sexism, inequality, tradition that make it possible, are part of our dinner-table conversation with the next generation, it will continue. Is it polite and comfortable to talk about it? No. Must we anyway? Yes.

It seems daunting. But which is more painful: talking sensibly with young people about this issue, the same way we might talk with them about drugs, guns or bullying, or waiting for something terrible to happen so close to home that you have to address it in a time of turmoil?

Children can seem fragile, and adults often have the mistaken notion that telling children about harsh realities will destroy their innocence. But you do not lose innocence when you learn about terrible acts; you lose your innocence when you commit them. An open culture of tolerance, honesty and discussion is the best way to safeguard innocence, not destroy it.

Changing rape culture is family work, but it cannot be only family work. It is a public health issue of gravest concern. The statistics are everywhere, but the evidence is weirdly shadowy: like the one in four girls abused in South Africa, by the one in four men who admit to having raped someone. (But who are these girls, and where are these men? Hardly anyone is talking.)

The cost in human suffering, lives decimated, families destroyed, mental anguish, physical trauma the cost of rape is probably bigger than any of us can comprehend. Rape is expensive. Not just families from China to Canada, but also all the important institutions in young people’s lives everywhere schools from Finland to the Philippines, youth programmes from London to Laos should spend less energy ignoring the issue and more energy helping children understand the basic concepts of respect and choice.

Yes, governments must step up. But so should we all. Why shouldn’t rape be dinner-table conversation? We talk about war, we talk about death, we discuss values with our children. But on the subject of sexual assault, we remain silent and squeamish. We leave them ill-prepared, with whispers of untold horrors and no guidance for our sons on how they should behave if one day they should find themselves in a group of boys with a girl in their power.

Rape does not exist in a vacuum, and we cannot talk about it as if it is removed from the rest of our lives. Let’s teach our children that they don’t need to live in little boxes defined by their gender or culture. Let’s teach them that they are all of equal worth. Let’s not favour our boys over our girls. Let’s not tolerate bullying or stereotyping. Let’s reject utterly the notion that boys will be boys and girls must work around this assumption or pay the price.

Yes, policies should change, laws should be just. But if we want to make a fundamental difference, all of us must bring the conversation home. It is our opportunity to start to create true change. It might not be polite and comfortable, but it is essential. We owe it to our children.

— Guardian News & Media Ltd

 

Desmond Tutu is archbishop emeritus of Cape Town and a Nobel peace laureate. Jacob Lief is CEO of the Ubuntu Education Fund. Sohaila Abdulali is author of Year of the Tiger, The Madwoman of Jogare and Bye Bye Mati: A Memoir in a Monsoon Landscape.

Comments (1)

  1. Added 09:20 April 29, 2013

    If we follow teachings of Islam in our daily lives and also punish the culprits according to Islam laws, such incidents will not happen.

    Azmat, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Gulf News
Quick Links

  1. Business

  2. Sport

  3. The latest Entertainment news

  4. The latest Lifestyle stories

  5. Blogs

  6. Opinion

In Opinion

  1. Meet Our Writers

  2. Columnists

  3. Editorials

  4. Off the Cuff

  5. Your say

  6. Speak Your Mind

Latest Columns

  1. Let Arabs not count on western powers

  2. Obama sleepwalks into history

  3. Phobia that brought a bank to standstill

  4. Display of Israeli pathologies

  5. Bringing home Nigeria’s missing girls

  6. Hong Kong’s political future in limbo