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The best time to be in showbiz: Imran Khan

The heartthrob says fresh storylines and new filmmakers have re-energised Bollywood

  • IANS
  • Published: 14:45 February 3, 2013
  • Tabloid

Talented Imran Khan says with the influx of new filmmakers and fresh storylines in the Hindi film industry, this is the best time to be a part of showbiz.

“So many good and talented young directors, producers and writers are coming in. The kind of films that are being made today and the kind of cinema that the audience has been supporting... we could not hope for anything else,” said the actor.

“Whether it is ‘Matru Ki Bijlee Ka Mandola’ or ‘Delhi Belly’, if such kinds of films were being made 10 to 15 years back, they wouldn’t have worked at the box-office,” Khan said.

In a short span of four years, Khan, nephew of Aamir Khan, has proved his mettle with impressive performances. He says an actor lives for audience appreciation, and that is what he also looks forward to through all his projects.

“An actor always wants to do something different. We live only for the appreciation from the audience. This is what we want. We want that the audience likes and appreciates our work and we want that they remember every role we do. That is what every actor is trying to do,” the actor said.

“I want people to remember the roles that I do. But ultimately, success or failure is not in our hands. We don’t know what will happen [with any film],” he added.

Khan made his Bollywood debut with 2008 film “Jaane Tu...Ya Jaane Na”. He was later seen in films like “Kidnap”, “Luck”, “I Hate Luv Storys”, “Delhi Belly”, “Mere Brother Ki Dulhan” and most recently in “Matru Ki Bijlee Ka Mandola”.

Khan admits he chooses to do only those films he thinks he can enjoy as an audience.

“I just ask myself a question – ‘As an audience, will I be going to watch such a film?’ If I get a positive feeling, I just get on to it,” said Khan, who will soon be seen in a prominent role in “Once Upon A Time in Mumbaai 2”.

Over the years, even the business dynamics of the Hindi film industry have changed in a big way. Unlike earlier, when the success of a film was measured by its silver or golden jubilee run at the theatres, the fate of the film is now decided within the first three days of a movie’s release itself.

Khan agrees.

“Twenty to 25 years ago, only 300 prints of a film used to be released. Today, even if you release a small film, it will release with 600 prints, and big films will release in 2,500 to 3,000 screens,” said the actor.

“[Now] It is not about time; it is about how many people see the film,” he added.

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