Dealing with inconsiderate drivers

Readers write to Gulf News about issues affecting them and their community

Gulf News

Dealing with inconsiderate drivers

I’m very happy that motorists are being fined for not giving way to ambulances (‘Emergency services: 128 motorists fined for failing to give way’, Gulf News, November 21). These inconsiderate drivers need not only fines, but to be jailed for a day! The police need to extend these fines to even those people who tailgate and drive behind a police vehicle or ambulance to get out of a traffic jam.

From Ms Samira Iqbal

Dubai

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Giving way in all lanes

I think that a Dh500 fine is too little for putting someone’s life in danger. Do people need further training on how to give way to ambulances? I think infotainment advertisements should run in public places and especially in hospitals where people are actually sick and will understand this situation better. One thing I have noticed is that not all lanes move aside. People on the lane next to the one with the ambulance should also move to give way to the cars in the lane of the emergency vehicles.

From Ms Mahnaaz Shaikh

UAE

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Staying in the road

Drivers with a minor fender bender accident who stand around, waiting for police and blocking the traffic flow should be heavily fined, too (‘Accidents slow down traffic in Dubai’, Gulf News, November 21). I’ve seen so many cases on the roads where they could have easily snapped pictures of the accident scene and used the Dubai Police app to report their accident. That way they could move the car to the side, but instead they stand around while traffic builds up.

From Mr Mohammad Abu Shaker

Dubai

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Rubber necking

Even when people do get out of the way, Mr Mohammad Abu Shaker, you still have to cope with the rubbernecking drivers passing. It could the smallest accident, but if you are on the side of the road, people can’t help, but be curious and look. Rubbernecking not only slows down traffic, but it’s very dangerous. It can lead a driver to drift into another lane or create panic behind them for the people who don’t understand why the traffic is slowing down.

From Mr Jose Guitarra

UAE

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Making all cars safe

After going through Gulf News articles online regarding the causes of road accidents, I found that the most common cause of accidents seems to be from drivers who are distracted using their mobile phone, eating or smoking while driving, listening to loud music and high speed driving. We are in a time period where technology is reaching another level. As a result of increasing accidents, major car manufacturers turned to research that would help minimise accidents. Now we have airbags, parking sensors, speed limit control sensors and now facial recognition infrared cameras to detect drivers’ movement while driving and warn them before a worst case scenario happens. In 2007, one car manufacturing company was the first to introduce this type of system into vehicles.

Afterwards, fellow car manufactures started to use their own systems to minimise the damages to the drivers and passengers on board. Currently, most vehicles in the UAE have this technology, but still there are some old vehicles on the streets running without any of these safety features. Maybe implementing new rules on driving or being more strict on current rules will be a short-term answer for these accidents. We can pay a fine for a speeding ticket, but it won’t reverse the harm caused by an accident after it has happened. The most efficient and the best way to minimise accidents is implementing new laws on importing vehicles with standards of technologies, which helps protect drivers and passengers. It finds a better solution to upgrade current vehicles that are currently on the roads.

From Mr Thuan Rasheen

UAE

Taught every year

Every year we hear the same stories about accidents from the fog and nobody seems to learn. Instead there is a rather surprised look on their faces when a crash happens (‘Fog causes 25 car pile-up in Abu Dhabi’, Gulf News, November 22). We know there is fog, we know when it happens and we are told every year how to drive in the fog.

From Mr Nick Strachan

UAE

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Proceed with caution

The same thing happened last year. Come on, people! When there is fog, you need to take the necessary precautions and proceed with caution. It’s common sense. Thank God, no lives were lost.

From Mr Esmail Adams

Dubai

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Use proper lights

People don’t need to use headlights, but dim lights. Plus, hazard lights must not be used during foggy conditions.

From Mr Cibt E. Hacan

Dubai

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Slow down

Fog does not cause accidents. People who drive foolishly cause accidents. Slow down, pay attention.

From Mr Toby Masson

UAE

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Don’t risk your life

The fog happens at certain times in the morning. If it’s bad and a person is on their way to work, they should be able to pull over and call their boss and explain the situation. If you don’t feel comfortable driving, then stay put until it begins to clear – it does clear. Any responsible employer will understand and not want you to risk your life to be at work on time. If they do, then they don’t deserve you.

From Ms Divya S.

UAE

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Unique to UAE

The Gulf News report about the Emirati businessman who bought a licence plate for Dh31 million made me shocked (‘Emirati businessman pays Dh31million for Abu Dhabi Number 1 car plate’, Gulf News, November 20). It is a bid six times more than the reserved price. Of course there is a craze for vanity number plates across the world, but it is something so unique to the UAE to see these special plates as so valuable.

From Mr Sunny Joseph

Mala, India

Too many accidents

This is one of the worst train accidents that India has witnessed in a long time, which makes this Gulf News report a sad and painful read (‘India train derails, death toll crosses 142’, Gulf News, November 21). The Indian railway should do a probe into the real reasons for this mishap and punish the guilty severely. On one hand, the railway authorities are increasing the number of routes and modernising the bogeys, but on the other hand, accidents are increasing and this is really worrying. Periodical check-ups on lines and other parts of trains should be monitored to avert the mishaps to a certain extent. Passenger safety is most important. I pray for the victims and a speedy recovery for injured.

From Mr K. Ragavan

Bengaluru, India

New trainer in Kerala

It is really heartening to know that the Kerala Cricket Association has signed up the former Australian pacer, Jeff Thomson, to produce quality fast bowlers. This is a progressive thought and augurs well for the pace bowlers in the Indian state of Kerala. It will not only enable them to strike a balance in their Ranji team, but also enable them to stake a claim on the national team. Let us hope that Thomson will be able to produce at least two to three quality pace bowlers every year.

From Ms Janaki Mahadevan

Mylapore, India

Creating ripples in tennis

Kudos to Andy Murray for winning his first Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Tour finals – that, too, beating the determined Novak Djokovic, who was keen to regain his world position in Tennis, which he lost to Murray last week (‘Mubadala World Tennis Championship: Andy Murray eyes third title’, Gulf News, November 22). It was a real tussle all through the tournament for Murray, especially in the semi-final match against Milos Raonic. Only time will tell whether he will be able to hold on to this ranking for long, as apart from top players like Djokovic, Kei Nishikori and Stan Wawrinka, there are many youngsters who are shining match after match. Anyway, it has been a promising epic year for the Murray brothers, who have created ripples in the tennis world.

From Mr N. Mahadevan

Mylapore, India

Editor’s note: Is there a news report that you feel strongly about? Something that has to be addressed in the community and requires resolution? Email us on readers@gulfnews.com. You can also post a comment on our Facebook page or tweet to us @GNReaders.

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