Opinion | Letters

Letters: January 23, 2013

Letters: January 23, 2013

  • Gulf News Readers
  • Published: 16:55 January 22, 2013
  • Gulf News

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Be responsible

I suggest that one should always check the electronic products they have purchased at the time of delivery (‘It is never too late to exercise your consumer rights,’ Gulf News, January 20). Once, I bought a new television, which turned out to be faulty, but I only realised that after the delivery company left. In the store, there was no option to check the product, as it was packed and kept in the store room. However, when I went back to complain and ask for an exchange, the store refused to take it back, saying that it was broken by the customer. In such cases, the consumer protection rules do not work. We should be responsible enough to complete our duties in the very first place.

From Mr Ambarish Tripathi

Dubai

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Discouraging process

Exercising consumer rights is not easy. The last time I wanted to return a defected product, I had to stand in queue for almost an hour. The store managers actually have a slow process of exchange and return, which implies that they discourage such processes.

From Mr Seddiqi

Dubai

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It’s risky

Many stores do not have a warranty on the products they sell. It’s at the buyer’s risk. If you find a damaged or defected item, often stores do not take any responsibility when it comes to refunding or exchanging the item. How can complaints work for such stores and products? Websites that offer discounted products or services do not hold sole responsibility for the promotions that they feature on their websites. How would consumer protection work in such cases?

From A Reader

Dubai

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Compensate the customers

Many products in the market are sub-standard because of the cost factor. It is unfortunate that most of the time, consumers are unaware of their rights. I had a bitter experience when I bought a remote controlled helicopter for my three-year-old daughter before going on my annual vacation to my home country. The salesperson at the store had given me confidence by saying that the products are factory-sealed, thus there is no need to check them. However, when I reached home and presented it to my daughter, the toy did not work. I was upset about the money I wasted, but at that time, I was in a rush to pack and board my flight. I did not complain because of the lack of time. But I never went back to that store and warned my friends and family against it. The authorities must take strong and strict measures against faulty and fake products. The stores must provide compensation to the customers, in addition to returning the value of the product. I also suggest that the contact numbers for consumer complaints be advertised clearly in all stores. Thank you Gulf News for bringing up this issue.

From Mr Anil Kollakadavu

Dubai

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Much appreciated

It is good to know that consumer interests are best protected by this law. I think now, the manufacturers will have to be more careful and produce high-quality and durable products. This in return will benefit the consumers.

From Ms Fateh

Sharjah

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Fantastic job

I am impressed (‘Dubai public transport logs 1m daily average,’ Gulf News, January 20)! This is excellent progress towards more sustainable city transport. Although passenger trips is a great statistic, I would also like to know how many people do these statistics represent and what per cent of the urban population uses public transportation daily.

From Mr John Sitler

Abu Dhabi

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Improve efficiency

I use public transport everyday, both buses and the Dubai Metro. I would recommend that the wait duration at Metro stations be decreased to three minutes from current five minutes, especially during the morning and evening rush hours. Regarding public buses, I have a complaint. Sometimes they are late due to traffic or any other reason, but I think because they are a part of public transport, they need to be punctual. This would add to the efficient public transport system of the country.

From Gina Gelvero

Dubai

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Thumbs up

This is a great comment (‘There is no going back in Saudi Arabia,’ Gulf News, January 20). Saudi Arabia is heading towards a bright future. If you drive across Noor University in Riyadh, you will be impressed by the beautiful campus and the fact that many young women are students.

From Mr Romano Falco

Catania, Italy

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Great step forward

I think this is a great move, a way for women to participate in the nation’s progress and to give them a sense of achievement. Well done!

From Mr Sikander Memon

Cairo, Egypt

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(TO GO WITH A PICTURE AND RAGOUT)

This is with regards to my community report published on January 7, focusing on the issue of dark underpasses. I am happy that prompt action has been taken by the authorities to fix the lights in the underpass. I used the underpass last week and was impressed by the change. The new lights are brighter and more powerful than before. This encourages people like me to use the passageway. I would like to congratulate the authorities for their quick action and Gulf News for publishing my report. I am glad that Gulf News gives the community a platform to raise such issues.

From Mr Ajeet Kumar Pillai

Sharjah

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