Blogosphere - May 25, 2007

The Gulf News Web team delve into the blogosphere to bring you the best of blogging on the clashes in Lebanon that gripped the attention of the region and the world for the past three days.

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Gulf News

The Gulf News Web team delve into the blogosphere to bring you the best of blogging on the clashes in Lebanon that gripped the attention of the region and the world for the past three days.

Coup panic
Fear from coups and implied threats with coups have been a common feature of the political scene in Iraq.

After the formation of Maliki's government with all the rifts inside the major political blocs that accompanied that stage, the political map became quite complex that groups within the same bloc were sometimes thought to be conspiring against each other.

At the center of most coup rumors was almost always the Iraqi List and its leader Ayad Allawi.

Right now there's a new uproar, a panic attack in Baghdad about an alleged coup plan, again, by Allawi.

Yesterday al-Sabah gave half of its front page to a story condemning the alleged coup as well as a column by the editor in chief on the same topic.

The long piece is full of quotes from members of the parliament (4 from the UIA, one Kurd and one from the Accord Front) condemning, mocking, attacking and warning from the consequences of attempting to override the constitutional process but the paper fails to offer the slightest clue as to the nature and seriousness of this great "threat".
The half-page long story had only these lines about it:

The lawmakers gave these comments in response to news that alluded to discussions about the possibility of withdrawing trust from the government during a meeting organized by the Iraqi list led by Dr. Iyad Allawi in Amman May 17-19.

As you can see there's no mention whatsoever of a coup or about overriding the constitutional process.
http://iraqthemodel.blogspot.com/2007/05/coup-panic.html

No more Cinderella stories!
When I was a little girl, I read so many children's stories classics in Arabic and in English. It was my mom's treat to take me to a bookstore Down Town to buy the books I like.

Most of the girls' stories were ending in victory because the prince fell in love with her. The girl's happiness was always dependent on winning the heart of the prince. The only way to get out of her misry is by marrying her prince..


In today's world, men and women equally create their own happiness and such stories are no longer valid that's what got today in the new fairy tale.....
http://freedomforegyptians.blogspot.com/2007/05/no-more-cinderella-stories.html

Independent Ink
Sixty one years can seem like a short period of time but perhaps given the region, any nation in the Middle

East can appear aged. It would be easy to reminisce about Jordan's history, how it came to be; where it was and how it has become. It would be easy to focus on the changing skyline of Amman or the economy or the

share of scars our nation has garnered over the years from simply existing in one of the world's toughest neighborhoods. Time lines come easy; history hands them out for free. But can they really measure the experience?

Should we look to the past for reflection this Independence Day?
http://www.7iber.com/blog/2007/05/independent-ink/

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