Give way
Most motorists give way to an ambulance by moving right or left depending upon the lane in which the ambulance is in (“Ambulances have right of way, motorists warned”, Gulf News, November 1). But those motorists who follow an ambulance so that they can get leeway for a smoother ride are not appreciated. In fact, whenever an ambulance passes by, we start praying for the patient in it. Troubling ambulance service for petty matters is an act of irresponsibility.
From Mr Venkat S.
Dubai
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Clear the confusion
I think most motorists give priority to ambulances. It is just the confusion which might slow down the service. For example, if I’m the first one waiting for the signal to go green, I won’t move because of the traffic fine for jumping a red signal and, besides, my car would also be impounded. Some of my friends and I have had the experience of being fined although the authorities later waive the fine.
From Mr Darvin
Dubai
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Everything else can wait
I don’t see why motorists would have to cross an entire intersection to allow an ambulance to pass. All I do is move a bit to the right of the lane and usually cars on the right help out as well by giving some space. That much of space is enough for the ambulance to cross. As for those people who take advantage of the ambulance and start tailgating — it is a horrible thing to do! Let’s keep our priorities right. An ambulance’s need to get to the hospital is far more important than our need to reach work, home or wherever else it is that we are going.
From Amina
Dubai

Drive safe
Many motorists are stressed thinking of their jobs, earnings or loans (“Road accidents down 29 per cent in Dubai as awareness drive makes impact”, Gulf News, November 1). These days we can’t see any respect [for other motorists] on the road or in parking lots. If people drive within the designated speed [limit], someone would still follow them flashing their headlamps wildly — demanding way. In parking lots, if you are waiting for someone exiting a slot, another motorist will zip into the space without any hesitation or shame! Recently, I actually saw a person asking somebody for permission to park! I was shocked because I was witnessing such civility in a parking lot after a long time. I have also lost parking spaces several times, but I never cared to have an altercation over it. Drive safely — don’t forget someone is waiting for you at home.
From Mohammad Ali
Abu Dhabi
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Natural course
It is an excellent step to observe ‘no plastic bags’ day [in the Philippines] once a week (“Philippines retailers to observe ‘no plastic bags’ day once a week”, Gulf News, October 31). It will definitely help reduce the environmental impact of plastic bags and also reduce their adverse effects on human health. Some chemicals used for manufacturing plastic bags are transferred to humans not only during manufacturing, but also by simple usage — some compounds migrate from the bags to food packed in them. To control the environmental impact of plastic bags, the concerned authorities should make it binding on all retailers in the UAE to use biodegradable bags, which will disintegrate within 8 to 10 weeks if exposed to the sun.
From Mr Omar Kafil Ahmad
Abu Dhabi

Charge for plastic
The initiative by environmentalist in Manila to not use plastic bags once a week in malls, supermarkets and grocery stores is the start of something big. It will catch on until eventually everybody will stop using plastic bags and instead bring their own re-usable bags while shopping. Some stores in the UAE have started charging customers 30fils for every plastic bag that they use and they also have the facility for customer to return it and get their money back. If they can do it, why can’t other big supermarkets do the same? They could also charge customers Dh1 per bag to discourage them from availing it.
From Mr Raymond A.
UAE

Discipline rude taxi drivers
This letter is regarding a recent report related to a taxi driver punching a passenger in Abu Dhabi (“Commuter in Abu Dhabi says cabbie punched and abused him”, Gulf News, November 1). I also reside in Abu Dhabi and my wife and daughter have also complained about some drivers of the new taxis being rude and not returning the change. If the metre reading shows Dh9.25, for instance, and we pay Dh10, some of the drivers don’t return the 75fils. When asked, they become rude. So we want to bring it to the authorities’ notice that even after upgrading the old taxi service and introducing new ones there are still some misbehaved drivers. The authorities should take stern action when they receive serious complaints so it would be a lesson for other drivers.
From Mr Oscar I.
Abu Dhabi

Flexible public transport
The Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) has provided great modes of transport and we appreciate the cleanliness and affordability of services (“More than half a million make use of free public transport day”, Gulf News, November 2). But, I request them to make necessary short-term changes in keeping with commuters’ needs during special occasions. For example, during the last day of Gitex [Gulf Information Technology Exhibition], we took the Metro to avoid traffic and parking issues. However, the last train left at 11pm. To the surprise of thousands of passengers who were pouring into the station, there was only one bus to Deira after every 30 minutes and there was no bus to Bur Dubai. We finally managed to reach home at 2am. We request authorities to extend operating hours of public transport services for important occasions, maybe up to 12am. From Mr Raghu
Dubai
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Great service
I appreciate the Dubai Metro services and congratulate the authorities for creating and maintaining such a good rapport with the public. I am new here and arrived only two months ago from India. I have travelled on the Metro around six times and I liked the service. The fares are reasonable, too. But, I feel that the bus fares need to be reduced slightly.
From Mr Suhas
Dubai
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