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Do violent video games cause behaviour problems?

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Do violent video games cause behaviour problems?

Video games cause addiction and induce children to remain glued to their console for substantially longer periods of time, which I think often results in them giving up in activities. I have found that many young people tend to show behavioural changes. One of the major concerns in today’s world is that the increase of the nature of violence among youth. The Harvard Medical School of the Journal of Adolescent Health, as well as the British Medical Journal have concluded that there is a link between video games and violence.

The question isn’t whether games make children kill, because it isn’t that simple. The concerns are subtle yet worrisome. Parents should strongly keep an eye on what sort of games their children play. Even if video games do not directly create killers or murderers, they may tend to contribute towards insensitivity and indifference towards violence.

Many people around the globe believe that violence is caused due to failing in school and broken friendships. I strongly believe that violence and behaviour changes in children is caused due to video games and other media. Hence, I believe that a child shows behavioural problems due to violent video games and parents should be able to control the type of games a child plays to make sure that the child is safe from all problems and is ready to get into the outside world.

From Ms Manasvi Madhumohan

Dubai

Our moral duty

Undoubtedly, Dubai is a very well planned beautiful city (‘Community report: Change your attitude, change the world’, Gulf News, February 23). It’s our very first city to keep it clean by not doing anything that affects it’s cleanliness. As it is our second home. It’s our personal duty, too. At the same time, this has to be taught in schools and in homes. The people damaging the environment must be punished!

From Mr Mahendrakumar Babariya

Dubai

Let it go

Please return those ancient mobiles back to the museum, because that’s where they belong now (‘Nokia 3310 is back — and so is ‘Snake’, Gulf News, February 28). We’re working on how to make us into smart-humans and these people are trying to pull people back to the 1990s. Are they serious?

From Mr Mi Ezeokoli

Dubai

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It was the best!

But, Mr Mi Ezeokoli, it was the best phone. They also have the right to give it a chance. People need a phone for emergencies, but want to get away from the emails and intrusive and addictive apps.

From Ms Moza Mohammad

UAE

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Nostalgia

Ms Moza Mohammad, I strongly agree that these phones were real phones for their longevity and are strong phones, so I would definitely welcome the decision and I would even buy one to refresh the memories.

From Ms Sadia Khan

UAE

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Time to pay up!

When passengers are fined for being late to a flight or missing it, then why shouldn’t airlines not pay for more than a three-hour of delay (‘Emirates slams UK’s CAA action over flight delay compensation’, Gulf News, February 27)? Let’s keep it fair. It’s part of the law, so airlines should pay up.

From Ms Farida Amin

UAE

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Can’t control everything

Some factors are beyond an airline’s control, such as bad weather or a bird strike. The airlines should compensate passengers for the long delay caused by those uncontrollable factors? I don’t think so.

From Mr Zhang Deqi

UAE

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It’s specific cases

Mr Zhang Deqi, no one is asking them to. The European Union (EU) law for delays clearly specifies the cases that trigger a compensation and they are all and only imputable to airline caused delays. This includes mechanical problems and delays in fixing or changing schedules that don’t respect a certain notice period.

From Ms Gianmaria Vidale

UAE

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Accommodate passengers!

If someone is having a connecting flight and the flight doesn’t reach on time, the airline should pay for accommodating the passengers on a second flight. Some airlines are charging the passenger for taking another flight due to the late arrival of the first flight.

From Mr Abid Rahman

UAE

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Proper protocol?

Usually when there is an overbooking, the company would change plans to accommodate a greater number of customers or vice versa (‘Pakistan Airlines flies to Madinah with 7 passengers standing in the aisle’, Gulf News, February 27). I wonder what the aviation industry or the International Air Transport Association (AITA) would say about this. A probable fine or ban on the way.

From Mr Bassem Abou Saada

UAE

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What about safety?

I doubt that the investigation will have any outcome. No one gets punished for their wrongdoings! It’s a shame that the once best airline has become the worst the airline. Those seven passengers who agreed to stand on the flight were foolish! Standing up all the way? They should have caused chaos so the flight wouldn’t take off in the first place. Should something happen, God forbid, they won’t care about your safety, clearly, or else they wouldn’t have let this happen to begin with.

From Ms Amber Amjad

Montreal, Canada

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Major consequences

Why did the passengers agree to that? This is a major breach of protocol. Such airlines should be questioned over the issue and banned for future events.

From Mr Bhatt Rameez

UAE

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Even the best drivers suffer

I feel that, laws and fines alone are not enough to stop the addiction of texting and driving. Is it really that important to stay connected during every minute of the day? Texting or using a mobile while driving is hazardous to yourself and the people surrounding you. The lives of innocent people are being taken every day due to a simple distraction. Car crashes are four times more common to take place while the driver is on their mobile device over any other causes.

Everyone thinks they are the best driver, or a pretty good one to say the least, but all it takes is for your eyes to be off the road for a few seconds and an accident can occur. You’ve heard how texting while driving can be just as dangerous as driving under the influence. That should be enough right there. So many people have mobiles and text regularly on a minute-to-minute basis that it’s hard not to send a quick message while behind the wheel, but for your sake and others out there, wait until you stop driving. You’ll see the person soon enough.

Each one of us should take the effort. Make a habit of thinking about what calls or texts you need to send before you begin your trip. Stow your phone somewhere you can’t peek at it. Silence notifications that tempt you to check your phone. There are several types of apps on the market, some of them free, which allow you to block incoming messages or send automatic responses to let your friends to know you’re driving.

From Ms Megna Rajagopal

UAE

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It’s an addiction

It’s not only a criminal addiction, it’s a crime against humanity performed by and largely by callous people devoid of any sense of responsibility and common sense. I have seen people smoking, texting and driving at a dangerously high speed. These people, whatever one may call them, do not have any sense of social responsibility. It is against all norms of decent living, which should be looked upon very seriously by the authorities. Teach them all a good lesson by slapping them with a heavy fine and imprisonment.

From Mr Thomas Matthew Parackel

Muvattupuzha, India

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