Opinions | City Talk

Keeping track of latest news in a hi-tech world

News seems to be everywhere. You can hardly move without seeing a newspaper or magazine giving the latest updates on Iran's nuclear activities or Britney's new haircut.

  • Staff Reporters
  • Published: 00:00 June 10, 2007
  • Gulf News

  • Image Credit: Gulf News
  • "The good thing about newspapers is that there is more variety of news in (it)," says Nida Fatmi.
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Dubai: News seems to be everywhere. You can hardly move without seeing a newspaper or magazine giving the latest updates on Iran's nuclear activities or Britney's new haircut.

In offices, living rooms and cafes, plenty of us love to surf the Net to see what is happening in our home countries, while in the background the radio gives us hourly updates on the things that matter.

And of course the march of technology means we can walk around with the news in our pockets, as mobile phones can receive SMS updates on breaking news. But which is the best way of finding out about the day's news? City Talk took to the streets of Dubai to find out what a selection of residents thought.

According to Indian sales executive Ravindran Rajan, 34, the internet is the best place to search for the day's headlines. "The internet gives up-do-date information. Just sitting at my desk I can get that information," he said. "I have SMS alerts as well."

Chris Melvold, 52, a teacher, is another internet fan, as she finds the worldwide web is the best place to go to find out what has been going on in her native Australia. For local news Melvold reads newspapers.

"I find it really hard to get local news on the television because I don't speak Arabic," she said.

Mohammad Eisab Eliyas, 28, who works in the travel industry, said he reads newspapers in his spare time during the day.

"I am always busy but when I am waiting at the reception in an office, I read a newspaper," he said. "I watch television news from my home state in India ... I don't use the internet."

Indian salesman Shaheeb Ippou, 25, reads the papers although he gets news from other sources. "Newspapers are very widely available but SMS news alerts are a very good idea too because everyone in the UAE has a mobile phone."

Jordanian salesman Rafi Thabit, 26, said he logs on to the internet and listens to the radio to learn what is happening in the world.

His busy lifestyle means that he does not usually have time to sit down and read a newspaper or watch bulletins on the television.

"When you are driving in a car, you can listen to the news on the radio," he told City Talk.

British businessman Jonathan Brown, 48, said the internet is the best place for him to get the news he is interested in. "In Britain, I listen to the radio but I don't listen to it here."

Indian engineer Nida Fatmi, 23, said although she sometimes uses the internet to read the news, her preference is for newspapers. "The good thing about newspapers is that there is more variety of news in [it]. With the internet, you have to search."

Although news might seem to be everywhere, some of us prefer to take an interest in other things.

Burmese shop worker Aung Thu Win, 28, said he does not usually read newspapers or watch the latest news bulletins. "I just use the internet to check for jobs or for online chatting and I don't watch the news on television, I watch movies instead."

Gulf News
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